Archive for WA House

Bills fall by the wayside after mid-session cutoff

By | March 13, 2015 | 0 Comments

While some bills made it through the halfway point, and will continue to be considered, other bills have fallen by the wayside.

Gov. Jay Inslee told reporters on Thursday that he was disappointed that a bill limiting vaccination exemptions did not make it to the House floor for a vote. He said the Department of Health will find “new, creative ways” to get information about vaccines to parents this year, and he hoped to see the bill return next year.

Doug Reuter, the father of the namesake of Joel’s Law, told AP that he was hoping to see lawmakers pass House Bill 1450, which would have expand the criteria for involuntary treatment.

House Republicans posted a list of bills the caucus was following. Dead bills listed in the House Republicans’ “good” category include House Bill 1446, which would have permitted certain restaurant employers to pay 16- and 17-year olds less than minimum wage; and House Bill 1741, which would have allowed disabled people to enter state land without a Discover Pass.

Senate Democrats also released a listed of dead bills that its caucus had backed. The list included Senate Bill 5752, regarding creating statements of impact on ethnic and racial minorities for bills affecting criminal justice, human services, and education, and Senate Bill 5527, which would have extended the deadlines for voter registration.

We also asked on Twitter what bills people wished made it through.

Bills face first policy cutoff

By | February 23, 2015 | 0 Comments

It’s nearly half-way into the 105-day session and time’s up for Washington state lawmakers to pass non-budget bills out of committee.

Feb. 20 was the first policy cutoff of the session and the end for many of the more than 2,200 bills introduced so far this year.

Lawmakers are still considering an increase to the state’s minimum wage, a push to make it a crime to hold a phone while driving, a bill to require doctors to notify parents when a teen seeks an abortion, a push to remove personal belief as a vaccine exemption. The full list of bills that made out out of committee by the policy cutoff deadline is here.

Stalled bills include a push to discourage minors from vaping, an effort to abolish the state’s death penalty, a bill to make it a crime to secretly record video at a farm and a proposal to end Daylight Savings in Washington.

Gov. Jay Inslee last week signed the first bill of the session, adding nearly $218 million to the 2013-2015 operating budget for natural disasters, court payouts and other unexpected costs.

Bills with a fiscal note have until Friday to receive a committee reading. The next deadline for bills to pass out of their house of origin is March 11.

Categories: Olympia, WA House, WA Senate

Senate, House Democratic leaders respond to MCC energy proposal

By | February 5, 2015 | 0 Comments

State Democratic leaders on Thursday responded to Republican Sen. Doug Ericksen‘s new proposal to address climate change and reduce statewide carbon emissions.

Ericksen and Senate Majority Coalition members on Wednesday introduced an energy plan they say focuses on incentives over penalties. Democratic Sen. Maralyn Chase was also part of the rollout and spoke in support of the proposal, which allows utilities to meet green energy targets through alternative measures, such as installing electric car chargers.

Minority Leader Sen. Sharon Nelson said the mostly-Republican proposal is a start. “I’m pleased as far as climate change that we are actually hearing Republicans say there may be human impacts that are affecting climate change,” Nelson said. “That’s a major step forward.”

Over in the state House, Majority Leader Rep. Pat Sullivan said his caucus plans to push Gov. Jay Inslee’s carbon reduction proposal through an environment committee next week. Inslee’s plan would set a cap on statewide emissions and require the state’s top 130 polluters to buy allowances above a certain limit. House Bill 1314, the governor’s proposal, is scheduled for a committee vote on Tuesday.

Ericksen, who chairs the Senate Energy, Environment and Telecommunications committee, has said he will give Inslee’s plan a hearing in his committee if it passes off the House floor.

Although the MCC has not said whether its proposal is meant as an alternative to Inslee’s plan, Ericksen said in a statement that in the Senate “we’re about carrots, not sticks.” Instead of charging pollutors, the MCC plan would give power companies new ways to comply with voter-approved Initiative 937, which in 2006 required utilities to boost energy obtained from renewable resources.

Public utilities would be able to count as part of the initiative converting motor fleets and ferries to liquefied natural gas and creating more electric vehicle charging stations. Other bill includes tax incentives for expanding nuclear power with small modular reactors.

Senate Bill 5735 was heard Thursday in the committee, but has not been scheduled for a vote.

On ‘Legislative Review:’ Two-thirds vote to raise taxes, opening day activities

By | January 13, 2015 | 0 Comments

On Monday’s edition of “Legislative Review,” we have highlights from the Senate floor debate over changing the rules to make it harder to raise taxes. We also cover Sen. Pam Roach‘s election as president pro tem, House Speaker Frank Chopp‘s speech and other details from the first day of the 105-day session. Plus, transportation leaders discuss gas taxes during TVW’s opening day show.

Legislative Review” airs nightly at 6:30 and 11 p.m., recapping each day’s legislative activities.

Categories: WA House, WA Senate

Lawmakers spar over proposed capital gains tax

By | January 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

The debate over Gov. Jay Inslee‘s proposed capital gains tax continued along party lines at Thursday’s Associated Press Legislative Preview event.

The tax was debated on a budget panel that included Rep. Ross Hunter (D-Medina), chairman of the House Appropriations Committee; Sen. Andy Hill (R-Redmond) chairman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee; Rep. Bruce Chandler (R-Granger), ranking Republican on the House Appropriations Committee; Sen. Karen Fraser (D-Olympia), member of the Senate Ways and Means Committee.

Inslee last month proposed a $39 billion 2015-17 budget that ends a number of tax breaks, charges carbon polluting companies and raises $800 million over two years through a proposed capital gains tax. The proposed capital gains tax would be 7 percent on money made from the sale of stocks and bonds above $25,000 for individuals and $50,000 for joint filers — which lawmakers say would affect the top 1 percent of earners in Washington state.

Inslee, in his Q&A session, defended his proposal of a capital gains tax, saying it gets the state closer to a system that can get the benefit of people earning more money without also increasing the tax burden on lower-income and middle-income earners.

“If we can tax higher income folks when they get capital gains, and not lower income folks when they buy a pair of shoes, that’s good,” he said.

“Whatever the concerns on the volatility of the capital gains tax, the alternative is zero,” Inslee said.

Sen. Andy Hill (R-Redmond)

Sen. Andy Hill (R-Redmond)

Hill criticized Inslee’s budget as perpetuating what he called a “deficit myth,” in which the only option was to raise taxes.

He said that because the state’s revenue has risen by more than 4 percent in each of the past two years, the state can continue its existing services and put an additional $1 billion in state education funding over two years.

“When I’m talking with business groups, I ask, ‘Would you like 4 percent growth year over year in this economy,’ ” he said. “I see nods. With some I see a little drool.”

“To say we have a huge budget problem, I think it’s meant to scare people,” Hill said. “The next step is you have to raise taxes.”

Hill also said that a capital gains tax is too unpredictable to be a reliable source of funding for school education, which was one of the requirements under the McCleary ruling. (more…)

Categories: Budget, WA House, WA Senate
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House, Senate leaders discuss priorities for 2015 session

By | January 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Washington State Legislature’s top priorities for the 2015 session should be education funding, mental health and tax reforms, state House and Senate leaders said Thursday.

Senate and House leaders at the AP Legislative Preview

Senate Majority Leader Mark Schoesler, Senate Minority Leader Sharon Nelson, House Speaker Frank Chopp and House Minority Leader Dan Kristiansen discussed their agendas for the upcoming session at the Associated Press Legislative Preview.

Education is the top priority this year, they agreed. So do voters, as an Elway Poll revealed this week. The Legislature must meet the demands of the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision to fully fund K-12 education.

Kristiansen said House Republicans will continue to push for ¨Fund Education First,” an approach first introduced by their caucus nine years ago that would restructure K-12 funding.

“We do need to make sure we’re prioritizing based on our constitutional responsibilities, and we just haven’t done that in the past,” Kristiansen said.

Nelson, D-Maury Island, criticized the proposal. ¨We keep hearing ‘fund education first’,” she said. ¨I say fund children and families first … This is not a simple solution, it’s not time for a slogan. It’s time to work together to find real solutions.”

Lawmakers will also have to decide how to implement Initiative 1351, a measure passed by voters in November that would reduce class sizes at an estimated cost of $2 billion for the first two years. Voters approved another class size reduction initiative in 2000, but it never received full funding from the Legislature. This year, lawmakers will decide whether to fulfill the new class size mandate or suspend it.

Initiative 1351 is expensive, but Chopp, D-Seattle, said they will have to address voters’ wishes. ¨It’s a very important step forward for people in Washington,¨ he said. ¨You can’t just ignore it.¨

Each of the legislative leaders also identified mental health as a priority.

(more…)

Categories: WA House, WA Senate

On ‘The Impact:’ New lawmakers in Olympia

By | January 7, 2015 | 0 Comments

When the Washington State Legislature convenes next week, it will be a day of firsts – not just for freshman lawmakers, but for state history. The state Senate will welcome the Legislature’s first Indian immigrant lawmaker and, over in the House, the youngest woman elected since 1936.

TVW sat down with the lawmakers to discuss the upcoming session ahead of opening day.

When Seattle Democrat Sen. Pramila Jayapal takes the seat left by recently-retired Sen. Adam Kline, she’ll become first Indian immigrant and the only woman of color in the Senate.

Jayapal is known for her work as a civil rights activist and founder of OneAmerica, the state’s largest immigrant advocacy organization.

She’s representing one of the most diverse districts in the state and bringing along “a set of perspectives that desperately need to be represented in Olympia,” she said.

Rep. Melanie Stambaugh is the youngest women elected to the state House since the 1930s, but said she’s not worried about a lack of experience.

The 24-year-old Puyallup Republican beat five-term Democratic Rep. Dawn Morrell in one of the election’s biggest upsets.

“No one can have enough experience to be sitting in this seat,” she said. “I take it as a great opportunity, being young and not having a bias of thought that I understand everything.”

This week’s edition of “The Impact” features interviews with the two freshman lawmakers — watch on Wednesday, Jan. 7 at 7 and 10 p.m.

House Environment Leaders Talk About Priorities for the 2015 Legislative Session

By | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

Climate change legislation is just one of the many big topics Washington’s House Environment Committee will tackle during the 2015 legislative session.

Committee Chair, Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon (D – Burien), and ranking minority member, Rep. Shelly Short (R – Addy), stopped by TVW this week to talk about that and another big priority, oil train safety.

Be sure to watch this week’s episode of The Impact.

 

 

House Democrats Announce Committee Leadership

By | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

After reorganizing House committees for the next biennium, Democrats announced Wednesday who will be leading those committees.

The list is as follows:

·       Agriculture and Natural Resources: Rep. Brian Blake (Aberdeen), chair; Rep. Kris Lytton (Anacortes), vice-chair

·       Appropriations: Rep. Ross Hunter (Medina), chair; Rep. Timm Ormsby (Spokane), vice-chair

·       Business and Financial Services: Rep. Steve Kirby (Tacoma), chair; Rep. Cindy Ryu (Shoreline), vice-chair

·       Capital Budget: Rep. Hans Dunshee (Snohomish), chair; Rep. Derek Stanford (Bothell), vice-chair

·       Commerce and Gaming: Rep. Chris Hurst (Enumclaw), chair; Rep. Sharon Wylie (Vancouver), vice-chair

·       Community Development, Housing, and Tribal Affairs: Rep. Sherry Appleton(Poulsbo), chair; Rep. June Robinson (Everett), vice-chair

·       Early Learning and Human Services: Rep. Ruth Kagi (Lake Forest Park), chair; Rep. Brady Walkinshaw (Seattle), vice-chair

·       Education: Rep. Sharon Santos (Seattle), chair; Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self (Everett), vice-chair; Rep. Chris Reykdal (Tumwater), vice-chair

·       Environment: Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon (Burien), chair; Rep. Strom Peterson (Edmonds), vice-chair

·       Finance: Rep. Reuven Carlyle (Seattle), chair; Rep. Steve Tharinger (Dungeness), vice-chair

·       General Government and Information Technology: Rep. Zack Hudgins (Tukwila), chair; Rep. Tana Senn (Mercer Island), vice-chair

·       Health Care and Wellness: Rep. Eileen Cody (West Seattle), chair; Rep. Marcus Riccelli (Spokane), vice-chair

·       Higher Education: Rep. Drew Hansen (Bainbridge Island), chair; Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), vice-chair

·       Judiciary: Rep. Laurie Jinkins (Tacoma), chair; Rep. Christine Kilduff (University Place), vice-chair

·       Labor: Rep. Mike Sells (Everett), chair; Rep. Mia Gregerson (SeaTac), vice-chair

·       Local Government: Rep. Dean Takko (Longview), chair; Rep. Mia Gregerson (SeaTac), vice-chair

·       Public Safety: Rep. Roger Goodman (Kirkland), chair; Rep. Tina Orwall (Des Moines), vice-chair

·       State Government: Rep. Sam Hunt (Olympia), chair; Rep. Steve Bergquist (Renton), vice-chair

·       Technology and Economic Development: Rep. Jeff Morris (Mount Vernon), chair; Rep. Gael Tarleton (Ballard), vice-chair

·       Transportation: Rep. Judy Clibborn (Mercer Island), chair; Rep. Jessyn Farrell (Seattle), vice-chair; Rep. Jake Fey (Tacoma), vice-chair; Rep. Luis Moscoso (Mountlake Terrace), vice-chair

You can find the entire list of House Democratic committee assignments on their website.

 

Categories: Democrats, WA House

House Democratic Leaders Reorganize Committees

By | December 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Democrats have a new structure for House committees for the 2015 legislative session. Some committees have been canceled, others added, and some of the remaining will have new names and roles.

According to a document given to House members, there are now 21 committees instead of 23. The committees canceled include the appropriations subcommittees on education and the one on health and human services, along with the Government Accountability and Oversight Committee.

There is a new committee being formed to deal specifically with issues related to marijuana and gambling. It’s called the Commerce and Gaming Committee. The description on the document: “The House Commerce & Gaming Committee considers issues relating to commerce in alcohol, tobacco and cannabis and issues relating to the regulation and oversight of gaming, including tribal compacts.”

Also new next session, a State Government Committee. It will take over the ethics, campaign finance and other state agency issues often heard by the Government Operations and Elections Committee.

There is a new name and focus for the Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government and Information Technology. It’s no longer considered a subcommittee and will address issues of state government, LEAN management, and audits.

The new Labor Committee has a shorter name. The Workforce Development part was dropped from that committee and moved to the Higher Education Committee.

To read the House committee descriptions: 2015-16 committee issue areas (2)